Week of 3.27.17

Welcome to the home of Social Lights. New online reports with photos appear each week on the website and in the monthly print editions for the Birmingham-Bloomfield area and the Rochester-Rochester Hills area at the start of each month. If you want e-mail notification of when new Social Lights columns are posted to this site each Monday, sign up in the Newsletter Sign Up box at the lower right side of this home page.

Erin Go Bra(gh)

Kathy Broock Ballard’s annual St. Patrick’s Day charity event is a play on words – the Gaelic for “Ireland forever.” But her girlfriends, 70 came this year, know that the new underwear they bring will be cherished by the women-in-need clients of Grace Centers of Hope and CARE House of Oakland County. The happy hour party at the Village Club is emerald accented (see photo gallery) and noted for Ballard’s generous hospitality. The venue is special to the hostess because ”...my grandmother was one of the founders of this club.” The news maker at the party was Cheryl Hall-Lindsay. She arrived with a foot cast to go with her arm cast. Both injuries were sustained during her fitness run through the neighborhood, but the foot cast was brand new. “This morning I was hit by a car...and the driver ran over my foot,” she explained. Keeping fit can be dangerous.
shadow
This weeks social light photos…

/locallinkimages/OakConHdr.jpg

oakland confidential

April 2017

BIGOTRY 101: Who could have imagined that in 2017 anti-semitism would once again be rearing its ugly head. Sadly, some local Republicans confirm the toxic malady hit the state’s Republican convention in February, when party administrative vice-chair David Wolkinson of Birmingham ran for re-election to the party position. "There were a bunch of people who also wanted to be vice-chair who ...more»
Print
Email Link
Feedback
Report
Share
dreamstime_xxl_14699315
shadow
(click for larger version)
02/21/2017 - J. William Langston was working as the head of neurology in July of 1982 at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, in California, where a 42-year-old heroin addict was brought from the county jail after suddenly becoming unable to move or speak

Admitted for possible catatonic schizophrenia, Langston found that the patient appeared to be cognitive but unable to control his motor skills. The symptoms, he said, resembled those typically displayed by older patients during the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. Stiff, rigid and in a frozen state, five more zombie-like addicts began arriving at San Francisco Bay Area emergency rooms.

"A group of heroin addicts in the 1980s all developed full-blown Parkinson's disease overnight," Langston said, recounting the episode that ultimately led to a scientific breakthrough in the research of Parkinson's disease and linked its risk to a number of herbicides. "It looked identical to advanced Parkinson's. It was called 'the walking dead' on the street. Nobody had ever seen anything like it. Eventually, we found out what was going on."

The connection, so to speak, was a clandestine chemist who had cooked a bad batch of MPPP, a painkiller similar to Demerol first created in 1947 as an alternative to morphine. In 1976, the formula resurfaced when a 23-year-old chemistry student used the recipe to create an uncontrolled designer drug to be used as a synthetic heroin. The student, by no small coincidence, developed the same Parkinsonian symptoms as the addicts seen by Langston in 1982.

Working with law enforcement, Langston was able to find the source of the drug, analyze its chemical compound and identify an unintentional impurity called MPTP, which is created during the manufacture of MPPP when its temperature gets too high.

"They not only got high, but they became stiff and rigid," Langston said. "The drug they injected isn't toxic at all. But (MPTP) is a compound that can get in the brain, and once it gets there, it's converted to MPP+, and that's the toxin. It gets into the brain and wipes it out like a Nike missile. It's unbelievable how incredibly toxic it is."

Because Parkinson's disease isn't known to naturally occur in any species other than humans, researchers had no way to replicate the disease in animals prior to Langston's discovery. Within months of the finding, they were able to induce Parkinsonian symptoms in monkeys by using MPTP.

In 1988, Langston founded the Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center in Sunnyvale, California, where he now serves as Chief Scientific Officer. The non-profit, independent institute provides basic and clinical research, clinical trials and patient care for Parkinson's disease and related neurological movement disorders.

...continued on page 2
Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13


Tags: LONGFORM

Comments ()
Varsity Shop
News Tips
Signature Sothebys
Shades
BBAC
Kathy Broock Ballard
Click for Birmingham, Michigan Forecast

Site Search

Municipal meeting videos
spacer

Birmingham Commission
Birmingham Planning
Bloomfield Trustees
Bloomfield Hills City Commission
Rochester Hills City Council Meeting
Rochester City Council Meeting
Rochester City Planning Commission
Thanks for visiting Downtown

google-site-verification=GOCf-oRs7Jh_YdWG4W_ARbrZYW-kcX7oaUwdPjVglDI