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State House - 5Th District - Democrat



REGGIE REG DAVIS


Reggie Reg Davis is a community liaison for the city of Detroit and a retired broadcast journalist. He resides in northwest Detroit. He attended Wayne State University and Oral Roberts University and is founder/president of CeaseFire Youth Initiative. He previously was a Detroit City Charter commissioner, Detroit Deputy District Manager and a Wayne County commissioner.


Legislative bans on education topics


In 24 states legislation has been introduced to restrict or outright ban the teaching and/or discussion of certain topics such as race, racism, gender-based issues and how American history is taught in the K-12 public school system. Critics of these efforts to restrict what is taught in public schools say such legislation prevents open inquiry into important issues. Should the state legislature in Michigan dictate or restrict what is taught in public school classrooms? Would you support such legislation? Why or why not? Please be specific in your answer.


Our children should not be restricted from information, they should begin learning and researching true history and life experiences as soon as they are able to speak in complete sentences. I will not support legislation which restricts or bans the teaching or discussion of certain topics such as race, racism, gender-based issues and how American history is taught in the K-12 public school system.


Legislative ethics/transparency


Michigan continues to rank near the bottom in comparison with other states when it comes to codified ethics and transparency rules for state lawmakers. The Michigan House, during several recent sessions, has approved bills to force disclosure of personal financial information of House and Senate members, along with members of the administration, and in some cases members of the state Supreme Court and university boards, although the Senate has not advanced such bills. Would you support financial disclosure legislation and, if so, are the current bills approved by the House sufficient? Should the disclosed information be publicly available?


Yes, I support financial disclosure legislation and the current bills are probably not strong enough. The disclosed information should be publicly available because those who are elected by us, the people, should at all times be subject to scrutiny and evaluation by the people who put them there; it’s called public trust and transparency is a very important part of that type of trust.


Term limits for legislators/administration


Do you think the current term limits for House and Senate members are in need of review? Do you support the proposal for term limits that could be on the November ballot which would allow an elected House or Senate member to serve longer terms in either the House or Senate? Why or why not?


Yes, I believe that the current term limits for House and Senate members are in need of review. I support the proposal for term limits that could be on the November ballot which would allow an elected House or Senate member to serve longer terms. The state of Michigan should have term limits, however, I believe that three two-year terms for the House of Representatives and two four-year terms for Senate is not enough time for a representative of the people to serve. Many citizens never have the chance to know their representative because they come and go so fast.


State budget surplus


The state of Michigan has been running a general fund and school aid fund surplus for two years and is expected to carry over a surplus of $7 billion moving into the budget for fiscal year 2022-2023, which must be adopted by October 1. The surplus has been driven by growing tax revenues and a decline in student population, which reduces spending in that area by about $300 million annually. The budget surplus does not include nearly $15 billion in federal pandemic funding that will be spent over the next several years. A variety of proposals from the administration and the Republican-controlled Senate have been put forth, including tax cuts for both business and individuals. What are your ideas for using the budget surplus for the coming fiscal year’s budget? Be specific.


The budget surplus should be used to rebuild and prolong the infrastructure of our roads, bridges and highways. Michigan should never have a pothole season and our highways should run smoothly, similar to the roads in the state of New Jersey. The surplus should also be used in an effort to fight against senseless gun violence in which our state has its fair share of.


Highland Park water/sewer debt


Highland Park, a member of the Great Lakes Water Authority, since 2012 has failed to pay for what now amounts to over $54 million in water and sewer debt, which means member communities in Oakland County will be placed in a position to underwrite this debt whether through increased rates for water and sewer or tapping budget reserves to accomplish the same. The state of Michigan has failed to deal with this issue. What do you think should be the solution to this growing problem of a GLWA member community failing to pay for water and sewer services? Please be specific.


It’s probably not the absolute answer, however, one solution is that Highland Park water and sewer should be held responsible and they should pay whether by a long-term payment plan or a reduced lump sum. Either way, they need to be held responsible.


Voting law changes


Voters approved no-reason absentee voting and a number of other changes by a wide margin in 2018. There have been several attempts since 2020 to make changes to the election laws, but critics have charged that some of the changes would negatively impact some voters. Do you think further changes to the election laws are needed and if so, what specifically would those changes be? If you do, why do you think so? How would that impact the proposal voters passed in 2018?


Any type of measure or law that suppresses a citizen’s right to vote freely, safely and without any type of condition or stipulation is uncalled for and I do not support it.


2020 presidential election results


Do you accept the presidential election results of 2020 in Michigan? Will you accept the results of the 2022 primary and general election? Explain why or why not.


Yes, I do support the presidential election results of 2020 in Michigan and I will accept the results of the 2022 primary and general election. The state of Michigan has one of the most steadfast and reliable election systems in this country and I stand by it.


Michigan abortion ban law


In 1931, Michigan legislators adopted a law that banned abortion in the state, based on an 1846 ban that had been in effect. Now with the U.S. Supreme Court preparing to rule and likely overturn Roe v. Wade, some are concerned that the 1931 Michigan law will prevent any abortions here. Do you think the 1931 Michigan act banning abortion should be revised or eliminated to allow for abortions here if Roe V. Wade is overturned? Why or why not?


The 1931 Michigan act banning abortion should be immediately eliminated to allow for abortions here if Roe v Wade is overturned. A woman should have the absolute right to choose what she does with her body. I support a woman’s right to choose.


Right of redress


The Michigan House and Senate have in the past employed seldom used maneuvers to prevent the public from challenging laws that were enacted. Lawmakers accomplish this by attaching an expenditure provision to the legislation which then prevents citizens from petitioning to overturn the law. Citizens in Michigan are allowed referendum rights when it comes to legislation but not laws involving spending. Do you think that such legal maneuvers should be used by the legislature or do such actions diminish the rights of the public to challenge what lawmakers have adopted? What can be done to eliminate such maneuvers on the part of the legislature?


Citizens should allow their representatives to do their job, however, there should be certain thresholds set in place by which the democracy by which we live should come into play. If our legislators are continuously spending incorrectly according to the majority census of the citizenry, then the people should be able to step in and make some type of correction.


Why select you?


Why should voters choose you over your opponent(s) in this contest? Please be specific.


I campaign on the ideal of how important it is for us to save lives in the great state of Michigan. From my plans to reform mental health care to my stance as an anti-gun violence advocate, we must begin to shift our focus as a state to one of the most important reasons that we have government in place and that is for the safety and welfare of the citizens of our beautiful state. As state Representative I will sponsor and support bills that make for better auto insurance rates and for roads and highways that allow for better travel however, I will first and foremost be concerned with and support bills that stand for a healthier, safer, happier Michigander who can breathe fresh air, have access to good health care (physical and mental) and can go to school and walk the streets without the threat of gunfire. This is why the citizens of the newly drawn State House District 5 should vote Reggie Reg Davis for State Representative.


STEELE P. HUGHES


Steele P. Hughes is currently constituent services director for District 10 in the state House of Representatives for Rep. Mary Cavanagh (D-Redford). He received a degree in business administration from Northwood University. A resident of Detroit, he has been a board member and football coach for Detroit City Lions Youth Organization, involved with the Detroit branch of NAACP and Detroit PAL organization.


Legislative bans on education topics


The simple answer is no I will not support legislation that limits or bans of Michigan teachers from teaching critical topics. President Franklin Roosevelt said it best in his first inaugural address, “…the only thing we have to fear is fear itself – nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” Unfortunately, the political leadership in the Republican Party deems it necessary to attack educators like my wife, a current teacher in metro Detroit. Limit the critical analysis of our nation’s history and legislate nationalism instead of promoting free thought and unbiased environments. If the left is suffering from so-called wokeness, then the right is suffering from intolerance. As Malcom X was quoted, “Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.” Our children can’t be adequately prepared if we hide the truth, degrade the facts and whitewash our struggles that have led to some of this country’s amazing advancements.


Legislative ethics/transparency


To be a true public servant you must be open to public scrutiny. I am not sure if the current bills in the state house go far enough. The best model we have currently is the state of Alaska which ranks as one of the highest in ethics practices according to a 2015 Washington Post article. Personally, I would support a constitutional amendment creating a new elected State Office of Inspector General – this person should be non-partisan and given broad scope to investigate state political officials, state agencies, local government practices, open meetings and FOIA request/investigations. After the amount of fraud perpetrated on the UIA during the pandemic and the lack of trust in government we need proper oversight in Lansing and throughout the state.


Term limits for legislators/administration


This Michigander like many others supports term limits, but yes, we need to review our current model. Sadly, this legislative session rushed this proposal on the ballot. Now I agree with the financial disclosure provision of the ballot initiative, because currently law makers police themselves in this regard. Our constituents need to know if we have any financial conflicts of interest. We need more debate on term limits in both chambers, to keep political acumen but not a lifetime career.


State budget surplus


We definitely need an income tax cut for Michigan’s working families and repeal the draconian pension tax on retirees. I support the Governor’s proposal for $500 rebate checks to help Michigan families battling current inflationary hurdles. I would hope to work with my future GOP colleagues to create a more manageable tax relief bill. Yes, the income tax should be cut to 4 percent, but only for those making less than $500,000 annually. I believe the 4.25 percent should remain for higher income tax brackets. Budget surpluses are great, but in reality our state and local municipalities continue to face legacy cost (pension deficits) we need to seriously plan to resolve now and not later. My budget wish list would include the following: Increased funding in skilled trades training for high school and adult education. Increased funding for foster care and adult/senior care. Funding green infrastructure projects for example mixed rubber-asphalt based road paving (ex. Dickinson County) / Water retention ponds in metro Detroit to ease pressure on sewer system.


Highland Park water/sewer debt


This problem was created by the state of Michigan when Highland Park was moved to the GLWA system after their water treatment plant was forced to close. Now there is no easy fix to this problem, because Highland Park is not flush with cash or tax base to pay the outstanding debt. The immediate fix would be payment from the state of Michigan to cover the debts. The state in turn would have to cut revenue sharing to Highland Park to reimburse taxpayers. Highland Park needs to consider merging with a neighboring city to best provide services to the residents. But let’s be clear, Highland Park is only the problem we see right now. In our near future many small municipalities will face similar hardships. Growing legacy costs, higher interest rates on bond payments, decreasing population and lack of commercial/industrial growth. Michigan governments will have to think long and hard about adopting regional government structures to cut cost and deliver services to residents.


Voting law changes


The voters in Michigan have spoken and Lansing needs to respect the will of the people. I have no major concern with 2018 voter approved election law.


2020 presidential election results


Yes. Joe Biden is President of the United States and he won the state of Michigan’s 16 electoral votes. I trust Secretary of State Benson to monitor and help facilitate a free and fair election in 2022.


Michigan abortion ban law


I am a father to a beautiful baby girl and it is my duty to protect her at all cost. Part of this protection is my belief she and every other woman on our planet has the right to make decisions for her own personal health. This includes the right to have a safe abortion. The 1931 law is a relic that needs to be repealed. Doctors should not have to worry about criminal charges for providing this procedure.


Right of redress


We have seen the legislature use the expenditure tactic for the Emergency Manager law which was repealed by majority of Michigan voters. Yes, the public should have a right to redress all laws passed by the legislature. Although the remedy cannot be the same for all laws or we will have a free for all of special interest groups working to shape agenda and manipulate voters. One solution I could support is sunset clauses on legislation passed with appropriations that have been repealed before by voters. Or voter ballot initiatives could be petitioned to go on the ballot during that sunset period before a vote on renewal of the legislation.


Why select you?


Voters should vote for Steele P. Hughes because I am your average community member seeking to represent the everyday person. I am a son, husband, father and brother that’s running with honesty and integrity. Once elected, the legislation and appropriations that I will be focused on are education, healthcare, foster care reform and infrastructure with a focal point specifically on updating our underground infrastructure. I’m the only candidate in this race with Lansing experience, I have worked as the consultant services director for State House District 10 since January 2021. I’ve worked on over 4,000 unemployment claims, countless DHHS issues, assisted community members on navigating insurance claims and connecting them with resources when their basements flooded last summer. I’ve done the work in Lansing and I am looking to continue doing the work with just a different title as your next State Representative. So I ask for your support, please vote for Steele P. Hughes for State Representative on August 2, 2022. For more information, please visit www.strongerwithsteele.com


NATALIE PRICE


Natalie Price is a Berkley city council member, and was previously Berkley Citizens Engagement Advisory Committee Chair. She has a bachelor’s degree from Vassar College and a master’s degree from University of Exeter in the UK, both in English and critical theory. She has been active in Sierra Club, Equality Michigan and co-creator of Backyard Playroom.


Legislative bans on education topics


I will not support any legislation that attempts to dictate or restrict what is taught in public school classrooms. As a former teacher and as a mom of two elementary-age students, I know that kids need to be able to discuss race, racism, gender, sexuality, and the difficult realities of our nation’s history in order to learn how to navigate the world in which we live with kindness, compassion, empathy and the ability to make a positive difference.


Legislative ethics/transparency


As a city council member, I am subject to much stricter standards of ethics and transparency than my state representatives. My communications related to all city-related business are subject to the Freedom of Information Act. I also follow a clear policy that requires me to disclose any possible conflicts of interest before I take action or vote on any related matters. Our state lawmakers, members of the administration, and members of the state Supreme Court and university boards should, at the very least, be required to meet the same standards of ethics and transparency as our municipal leaders. If personal financial information has the potential to impact a state leader’s action or vote, disclosure must be required. I am in support of the constitutional amendment that will be on our November ballots, which will require statewide officials to file financial disclosure, putting Michigan in line with what 48 other states and Congress already require.


Term limits for legislators/administration


Under the constitutional amendment that is proposed for the November ballot, voters will have the opportunity to decide whether to allow lawmakers to serve 12 years overall in Lansing, spending potentially their entire time in the House or Senate or dividing the years between the two chambers. I support this proposal because I understand that the existing law (which limits members of the state House to three two-year terms and members of the state Senate to two four-year terms) does not allow enough institutional knowledge to accumulate for optimal leadership in either of these bodies.


State budget surplus


I support Governor Whitmer’s recently proposed budget and spending plan, which would roll back the retirement tax and triple the Earned Income Tax Credit, make the highest per-student investment ever, continue rebuilding our infrastructure, spur economic developments, back workforce development programs, and lower costs. I also support her proposed MI Tax Rebate Right Now plan, which would send a $500 immediate tax rebate to Michigan’s working families. I do not think that the surplus, which is bolstered by temporary COVID-relief funds, should be used for sweeping tax cuts, which would leave a permanent hole in the state budget.


Highland Park water/sewer debt


The state of Michigan is responsible for this issue and should foot the bill for it. Before 2012, Highland Park had its own water processing facility. The state shut it down and required that Highland Park participate in GLWA on an emergency basis with the promise of a remediation plan for fixing its facility. This “emergency basis” continued for a decade with water rates that Highland Park clearly could not afford. This situation is indicative of a bigger issue of our state’s failure to provide adequate support to our municipalities. Conflicting tax laws (Prop A and Headlee) improperly restrict how local governments can collect the money they need. The state has also diverted $8.6 billion in revenue sharing away from our cities. This has cost Highland Park alone $17,083,580 since 2002. We must fix this broken system in order to give all our cities the resources they need to provide essential services to our residents.


Voting law changes


When more people participate, our democracy gets stronger. Voters strengthened our democracy when they amended our state constitution in 2018 to enable no-reason absentee voting and required automatic voter registration. I support such changes that empower more eligible voters to participate and will fight against any changes to election laws that limit participation in our democratic process.


2020 presidential election results


Yes. We have a safe and secure election process, and the attempts to sow mistrust about the voting process since 2020 are a direct attack on our democracy. We must counteract fear with facts in order to sustain and increase participation in our election process. When more people participate, our democracy gets stronger.


Michigan abortion ban law


The 1931 law that bans abortions in Michigan must be eliminated in order to protect reproductive justice for all. Access to legal and safe abortion care is an essential element of access to affordable quality healthcare, which all people deserve.


Right of redress


Our Constitution says that voters may hold a referendum on any bill passed by the legislature only as long as there is no money expended. The intent was to prevent a situation in which the state would need to take back money that has already been spent; however, after the Emergency Manager law was repealed by voters, the party in power started throwing in at least $1 to their controversial bills so that voters couldn’t challenge them. This is just political gamesmanship plain and simple, and it has been used to deny Michigan residents their voice in our democracy. The legislature should be accountable first and foremost to the citizens of Michigan, which is why protecting access to the ballot through voting rights legislation and passing transparency and accountability laws is so important. Michigan citizens deserve a legislature that won’t use legal loopholes and anti-democratic tactics to pass laws in conflict with the interests of Michigan families, but will instead work on behalf of Michiganders to get things done on the issues that matter to the people.


Why select you?


We need leaders in Lansing who are well-poised to fight for the issues that matter most. As the only elected official in this race, I provide a clear voice of proven leadership. My voting record reflects our values of equity and inclusion, environmental protections, and support for local businesses. As a former teacher, I will advocate for strong schools throughout our region, ensuring that all districts have the resources they need. And as a mom, I will fight to keep all of our kids safe by fighting for common-sense gun laws and intentionally inclusive communities. I am grateful for the endorsements and support of Oakland County Treasurer Robert Wittenberg, former state Senator and state Representative Gilda Jacobs, state Representative Lori Stone, Oakland County Commissioner Charlie Cavell, as well as mayors and fellow city council members/commissioners from throughout our region. I will continue to build community as a trusted leader in Lansing.


MICHELLE WOODDELL


Michelle Wooddell, a resident of Southfield, is an associate professor in the School of Nonprofit, Health, Hospitality and Tourism Management at Grand Valley State University. She has a PhD in public administration from Wayne State University, a masters in public administration from New York University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from University of Michigan. She is a former board member of League of Women Voters and Junior League of Detroit, but has not held public office.


Legislative bans on education topics


I believe that trained education professionals – not state legislators – are in the best position to determine the material that is taught in our classrooms. As teachers, we are trained not only in our areas of specialization but also how to ensure that the material is delivered in an age-appropriate, culturally-sensitive and thoughtful manner. Parents who have concerns about specific areas should talk with their child’s teachers and the local school systems, not their state legislator. I am much more concerned about ensuring that all of our schools are properly funded, that our teachers are supported and that every student in Michigan has an equal opportunity to achieve their full potential. The system of educational funding in our state needs to be revised to promote more stability and long-term planning. Many of our school buildings are in need of infrastructure repairs and the personnel crisis in our public schools is real and needs to be addressed quickly yet competently.


Legislative ethics/transparency


I absolutely would support bills that increase transparency of the financial transactions of state lawmakers and I would support making these disclosures publicly available. In general, I believe that every Michigan resident has the right to know who is supporting our elected officials and we have the responsibility as voters to ensure that we do our homework about candidates. I also believe that Michigan needs to revise its campaign finance laws. This campaign has opened my eyes to the need for increased attention to the ways in which our elected officials fund their campaigns. I would like to limit the amount of money that Super PAC’s are allowed to spend in a given election, to increase transparency around “dark money” and to expand public disclosure of Super PAC donors. Putting the power back in the hands of the people as opposed to the lobbyists is, in general, a good thing for Michigan.


Term limits for legislators/administration


I believe that our state legislature could benefit from having more experienced individuals in place, so I do support the November ballot proposal. However, I believe that we need to do everything that we can to elect individuals who see public service as a chance to give back to their community, as opposed to a lifelong career. I believe that our system of government does better when we have leaders who come from all sectors of society – business, education, health care, the nonprofit sector, agriculture and more. We need leaders who are not just taking the next step in their lifetime of holding public office, but who are willing to step forward for a period of time to help address our state’s challenges. Out on the campaign trail, so many people have thanked me for running – for being willing to put myself out there even though I am definitely not a politician.


State budget surplus


This is a unique time in Michigan’s history, as we enjoy a budget surplus that will allow us to address some of our key statewide challenges. I would combine policies that provide immediate relief for our residents in this time of high inflation with policies that invest in our state’s long-term success. My priorities would be: Repeal of the “retirement tax” for Michigan seniors; Tax rebates for all Michigan residents, as proposed by Governor Whitmer; Investments in infrastructure projects throughout the state, including schools, roads, bridges and state parks; Investment in programs that address the need for increased mental health support in our communities; and support for programs that invest in clean energy production in Michigan so that we can be less reliant on other countries and states.


Highland Park water/sewer debt


Although I know there is some dispute about the legal underpinnings of this issue, the fact remains that a great debt has been amassed by Highland Park, one of our region’s poorest communities. The issue should obviously have been dealt with long ago, but since it has not, I support an immediate suspension of the extra fees that other member communities are now paying to help pay down this debt while we wait for the court case to play out. Alternatively, debt payments should be placed into escrow while the issue is settled. The larger issue, however, is ensuring that everyone in our region has access to affordable clean water. We need to invest more in strengthening and maintaining Michigan’s water infrastructure including lead pipe removal, drinking water treatment, storm water, and wastewater management.


Voting law changes


In my opinion, voting is the most fundamental right that we have as Americans and that’s why one of my very first volunteer positions in the community was as a member of the League of Women Voters of Michigan’s state board. In that role, I had a firsthand look at the ways in which a person’s ability to vote is impacted by their economic conditions, transportation issues and a lack of good voter information. I believe that there are many things that the state legislature can do to ensure that our election laws support full participation, including: Expanding equitable access to the ballot, including measures such as early voting, absentee ballot pre-processing, and full funding of our election administration at all levels. Declaring our polling places as gun-free zones. Expanding voter registration opportunities and making it easier for all residents to participate in the process.


2020 presidential election results


I was a poll worker in 2020 and this helped cement my faith in the voting process in Michigan. I saw so many people who were committed to ensuring the integrity of the vote that day and I absolutely accept the presidential election results. I will accept the results of the 2022 elections. This mistrust in our basic system of elections must end, as it is tearing at the very fabric of our democracy. We need to do more to educate the public about the processing of ballots and we need to ensure complete transparency throughout the process. Election deniers and their claims of stolen elections without evidence cannot be allowed to continue to disrupt our democracy without vigorous pushback from the majority of voters.


Michigan abortion ban law


First and foremost, I 100 percent believe that healthcare decisions should be made by the individual in consultation with whomever they choose and I support a woman’s right to choose to terminate a pregnancy. If Roe v Wade is indeed overturned, I think that Michigan’s leaders have an obligation to consider a bill to overturn the 1931 law and I would vote in support of its elimination. My larger concern is that an individual’s fundamental right to privacy is at stake in this debate and I believe that action at the federal level is needed to stop our nation from becoming a patchwork of different regulations with respect to privacy. Who I choose to marry, when I choose to have children and how I choose to live should, in general, should not be dictated or over-regulated by the government.


Right of redress


I think that, as a state, we need to be careful about the degree to which we allow policy measures to be adopted with just a high number of signatures, particularly when circulators have the right to lie when talking with voters. We see this now in Betsy DeVos’ push to allow public funding to flow to private schools. The people of Michigan have already spoken on this issue and the state constitution doesn’t allow it, yet if her petitions gain the correct number of signatures, it will automatically become law. That is a process that wreaks havoc with the normal democratic process. I believe that a mechanism already exists to hold legislators accountable for bad laws – elections. To be a functioning democratic republic, we need voters to hold their elected officials response for their action – or inaction – on an issue.


Why select you?


I believe that my district would be best served by my vast experience in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. I am a small business owner so I know all about the challenges of balancing the bottom line with the needs of my team. I am also an educator. Every day I see the challenges that today’s students face – from college affordability to the need to balance work, family and school. I also understand the importance of ensuring that students from all backgrounds and socio-economic situations have access to quality and affordable educational opportunities. Finally, I am a working mom with aging parents and an adopted son who struggles with his mental health every day. I know the challenges that families face in trying to balance everything that goes into living a full and productive life. Although it pains me to say it, I am also one of the oldest candidates running for this seat. I know that I would absolutely not have been the best representative that I could be if I sought this seat 10 years ago. Age has taught me critical decision-making skills, improved my negotiating ability and helped me understand the complexities of solving large-scale community problems.

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